Answered By: Aine Meehan
Last Updated: Feb 17, 2016     Views: 56

Plagiarism is the unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work.

While plagiarism in scholarship has a centuries old history, the development of the internet, where articles appear as electronic text, has made the physical act of copying the work of others much easier, simply by copying and pasting text from one web page to another.

Plagiarism is presenting someone else's work as if it were your own, whether you mean to or not. The Institute does not tolerate plagiarism of other peoples work.

Someone else's work means anything that is not your own idea. Even if it is presented in your own style, you must still acknowledge your sources fully and appropriately. This includes:
  • material from books, journals or any other printed resource
  • the work of other students or staff
  • information from the Internet
  • software programme's and other electronic material
  • designs and ideas
  • the organisation or structuring of any such material

Citing authoritative and appropriate sources not only gives more weight to your argument, it also provides evidence that you have read widely and can represent a wide range of views. It is important to follow a formal system of citing or referencing to avoid plagiarism and to ensure that your reader can easily locate the original sources of your citation.

 

Contact Us to make an appointment

Useful Links